Creating an Atmosphere of Magic

Magic Moments

The atmosphere of magic has been written about by Ascanio in his stunning book The Structiral Conception of Magic. This beautiful analysis transformed my mindset about what can be achieved with a performance of magic forever.

It’s a strange paradox for us Magicians, we have to present magic in such a way that our skill remains hidden.

The audience must not even sense we have done anything suspicious. We must create an atmosphere where they feel magic is present.

There is no greater compliment to me than when my audience says; “but…..you didn’t do anything….how is this possible”?

Even Sir Richard Branson fell under my spell.

So, how do we magicians create this atmosphere?

There is a formula that has worked for me which I will share.

  • Master your Technique
  • Master your Script and Delivery
  • Cultivate a love for People and your Audience
  • Distinguish your Character and Style
  • Honestly express yourself
  • Perform as often as possible
  • Listen to your audience
  • Perform with Joy & Passion
  • Energise yourself
  • Be Fully Present to your audience
  • Be Open, Be Receptive and Be Responsive
The Moment of Astonishment

Everything I have just written is a starting point towards creating an atmosphere that your audience will enjoy being in.

To repeat, it’s just the beginning.

Now, consider this; this is my process.

What will your atmosphere feel like?

Tommy Wonder was different to Albert Goshman and yet, they both made me feel their magic.

How will you know if YOUR audience has felt you?

How will you know if your audience has been touched, moved and inspired by your magic and self expression.

There is only one answer to this question; you must listen to your audience and be ready for their feedback.

It took me years before I was able to unlock this hidden mystery. I am a little better now and still listening. I am convinced about this because my friend and mentor Darwin Ortiz was the second person who said to me listen to your audience, the first person was Alan Alan.

So, what is next for you.

Here is a simple exercise; take one routine you do well and dissect it. Start again. Look at the script, does it sound right you, are you copying someone else’s words? If you are, take them out and re-write your script. Start again, find your voice, give your audience the best version of you. As time goes by, the best version of you will grow and expand the more you do this exercise.

Good luck.

This blog post was inspired by a member of my community Nate Green.

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